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BSP Co-Founders

Dayo F. Gore
BSP Co-Founder
Dr. Dayo F. Gore is an associate professor of African American Studies at Georgetown University. Prior to joining the department, she was an Associate Professor in the Department of Ethnic Studies and the Critical Gender Studies program at the University of California, San Diego and Chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies and founding Director of the Black Studies Project at UCSD. Her research interests include black women’s intellectual history; 20th century U.S. political and cultural activism; African American and African Diasporic politics, and gender and sexuality studies. She earned a Ph.D. in History from New York University and has previously taught at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Dr. Gore is the author of Radicalism at the Crossroads: African American Women Activists in the Cold War, which charts the political commitments and strategic leadership of a network of black women radicals operating within the U.S. left from the 1930s through the 1960s. Dr. Gore is currently working on a book length study of black women’s transnational travels and activism in the long twentieth century, forthcoming from Princeton University Press as part of its America in the World series.

Sara Clarke Kaplan
BSP Co-Founder
Sara Clarke Kaplan is an associate professor of Ethnic Studies and Director of Critical Gender Studies at the University of California, San Diego. A scholar of feminist and queer theory and African Diaspora literary and cultural production, her work has appeared in a number of journals, including American Quarterly, American Literary History, Callaloo, TDR, and the Journal of Black Women, Gender, and Families. Her book, The Black Reproductive: Feminism and the Politics of Freedom is forthcoming from the University of Minnesota Press. She is currently at work on two new projects: an interdisciplinary consideration of Black feminist geographies of slavery in the Americas; and a study of how twentieth-century Black aesthetic forms deploy Diasporic spiritual practices and cosmologies to reconfigure Black gendered geographies, histories, and subjectivities.